Graphic novels

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 08:44:08 +1000

Amanda Penrose <amanda [at] dd.com.au>

Amanda Penrose
Graphic novels are gaining recognition as literature in their own right. Just
don't call them comics, writes Helen Razer.

'Honestly , comics are not simply guys with big muscles and women in Spandex
beating the crap out of each other," says Danny Oz with sincere impatience.

Like many grown-up connoisseurs, he's a little weary of the notion that comics
are produced purely for kids.

So, if you normally think of comic-book stores as purveyors of straightforward
smut and easy heroism, you may just want to hush. Or, risk a hefty ZAP!, POW!
and intellectual THWACK! from the form's devotees and artists.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/arts/a-novel-concept/2005/08/09/1123353316468.html

--
Amanda Penrose
http://amanda.dd.com.au

You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.

Comment via email


Wed, 10 Aug 2005 10:38:31 +1000

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
On Wednesday 10 August 2005 08:44, Amanda Penrose wrote:
Graphic novels are gaining recognition as literature in their own right.
Just don't call them comics, writes Helen Razer.
...
http://www.theage.com.au/news/arts/a-novel-concept/2005/08/09/1123353316468.html

ARGH!

1) The Reporter writes as if the discovery of graphic storytelling as a place
where art and meaning can be found is new. Phpppt!
2) She regularly refers to Maus. Maus is fabulous. It was also first published
as a collected novel in 1992! Couldn't she come up with something more
current that is laudable? What about the two volumes of Flight put out by
Image Comics?
3) Oh I am sure that academia is getting more interested in comics. How many
PhDs can you write about the punctuation of Shakespeare (I kid you not), when
a requirement for this degree is that the research be new and original?
4) Yes, I am also sure that comics are now considered of moment since more and
more pretentiousness is being accepted there. After all, we all know if a
work is sufficiently dark and violent it must be important. Heaven forbid if
we recognise any artistic value in works of gentle beauty and humour like
Ghibli Studio's Totoro. (Does anyone seriously believe that To Kill a
Mockingbird would win the Pulitzer today? It would probably get relegated to
the young adult section of the book store and forgotten.)

Okay, I've vented enough.

Some amazing stuff has been coming out of the graphic storytelling industry
for some time both within and without the superhero tradition. I have also
found it sad that this field hasn't been given its due in respect. On the
other hand, it comes under the radar for most people, and as such has been
able to make much broader social comments than other art forms. This has been
supported by the fact that it has not been taken over and controlled by large
corporate interests. Anyone can publish and distribute comics and have them
sold by independent comic retailers around the world. What other industry can
claim that sort of independence? What other industry so fully represents
artistic, creative, and expressive freedom?

Toodles,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Comment via email

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 10:47:42 +1000

Amanda Penrose <amanda [at] dd.com.au>

Amanda Penrose
It's  pity actually since the people she interviewed clearly knew a lot more
about the art form - she seems to have written mostly from her own limited
knowledge. Sigh.
Still, I thought that even having an article on graphic novels linked from the
front page of the Age site was a (small) step in the right direction. And Maus
IS old, but unless someone tells you about it, how are you gonna find out about
it? No one told me about it til I read Scott McCloud's 'Understanding Comics'!
AJ


ARGH!

1) The Reporter writes as if the discovery of graphic storytelling as a place
where art and meaning can be found is new. Phpppt!
2) She regularly refers to Maus. Maus is fabulous. It was also first
published as a collected novel in 1992! Couldn't she come up with something
more current that is laudable? What about the two volumes of Flight put out
by Image Comics?
3) Oh I am sure that academia is getting more interested in comics. How many
PhDs can you write about the punctuation of Shakespeare (I kid you not), when
a requirement for this degree is that the research be new and original?
4) Yes, I am also sure that comics are now considered of moment since more
and more pretentiousness is being accepted there. After all, we all know if a
work is sufficiently dark and violent it must be important. Heaven forbid if
we recognise any artistic value in works of gentle beauty and humour like
Ghibli Studio's Totoro. (Does anyone seriously believe that To Kill a
Mockingbird would win the Pulitzer today? It would probably get relegated to
the young adult section of the book store and forgotten.)

Okay, I've vented enough.

Some amazing stuff has been coming out of the graphic storytelling industry
for some time both within and without the superhero tradition. I have also
found it sad that this field hasn't been given its due in respect. On the
other hand, it comes under the radar for most people, and as such has been
able to make much broader social comments than other art forms. This has been
supported by the fact that it has not been taken over and controlled by large
corporate interests. Anyone can publish and distribute comics and have them
sold by independent comic retailers around the world. What other industry can
claim that sort of independence? What other industry so fully represents
artistic, creative, and expressive freedom?

Toodles,

Katherine

--
Amanda Penrose
http://amanda.dd.com.au

You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 11:29:10 +1000

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
Hi Amanda!

On Wednesday 10 August 2005 10:47, Amanda Penrose wrote:
It's  pity actually since the people she interviewed clearly knew a lot
more about the art form - she seems to have written mostly from her own
limited knowledge. Sigh.

Pretty usual for most newspaper features.

Still, I thought that even having an article on graphic novels linked
from the front page of the Age site was a (small) step in the right
direction. And Maus IS old, but unless someone tells you about it, how
are you gonna find out about it? No one told me about it til I read
Scott McCloud's 'Understanding Comics'!

hehehe True enough. I've just had to put up with years of ignorance about
this art form. brings out the walking stick Why you young 'uns just don't
understand the finer points of graphic storytelling. Why in my day we told
stories using paper towels and a magic marker.

Toodles,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 11:34:39 +1000

Rose <rosanne [at] zip.com.au>

Rose
Oh come on, it was HELEN RAZER. What do you expect? She's not exactly a
journalist.

Rosanne

On 10/08/2005, at 11:29 AM, Katherine Phelps wrote:

Hi Amanda!

On Wednesday 10 August 2005 10:47, Amanda Penrose wrote:

It's  pity actually since the people she interviewed clearly knew a lot
more about the art form - she seems to have written mostly from her own
limited knowledge. Sigh.

Pretty usual for most newspaper features.


Still, I thought that even having an article on graphic novels linked
from the front page of the Age site was a (small) step in the right
direction. And Maus IS old, but unless someone tells you about it, how
are you gonna find out about it? No one told me about it til I read
Scott McCloud's 'Understanding Comics'!

hehehe True enough. I've just had to put up with years of ignorance about
this art form. brings out the walking stick Why you young 'uns just don't
understand the finer points of graphic storytelling. Why in my day we told
stories using paper towels and a magic marker.

Toodles,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Music, true music, not just rock ’n’ roll, it chooses you. It lives in your
car, or alone, listening to your headphones, vast scenic rituals and angelic
choirs in your brain. --  Lester Bangs, Almost Famous

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 12:06:51 +1000

Amanda Penrose <amanda [at] dd.com.au>

Amanda Penrose
Hel Razer eh? I didn't notice before, but that sounds like a great name for a
comic book villain don't you think? :-)
AJ

Rose wrote:
Oh come on, it was HELEN RAZER. What do you expect? She's not exactly  a
journalist.

Rosanne

--
Amanda Penrose
http://amanda.dd.com.au

You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.

Wed, 10 Aug 2005 12:08:55 +1000

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
On Wed, Aug 10, 2005 at 11:29:10AM +1000, Katherine Phelps wrote:
On Wednesday 10 August 2005 10:47, Amanda Penrose wrote:
It's  pity actually since the people she interviewed clearly knew a lot
more about the art form - she seems to have written mostly from her own
limited knowledge. Sigh.

Pretty usual for most newspaper features.

Actually this is one of the classic types of newspaper or magazine article
- "Look what I just discovered!  Isn't it amazing?"  Unfortunately
when the reporter has just discovered something that was a new trend
and extensively covered by other reporters more than a decade ago,
the article is only interesting to people who are fairly out of touch.
If an editor chooses to run the article anyway, that probably means that
they need to fill the space.

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***

P.S. Try Wikinews:  http://en.wikinews.org/
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Thu, 11 Aug 2005 09:04:39 +1000 (EST)

Panth <panthera_of_oz [at] yahoo.com.au>

Panth
understand the finer points of graphic storytelling.
Why in my day we told
stories using paper towels and a magic marker.

Now, that sounds like a party game to me ...

P.

"My idea of diplomacy is giving someone a choice of where they can bite me." ~ 
Panthera, 2003.

The SGC Roleplaying Game http://www.the-sgc.net
T-Shirts, caps, mugs and more - http://www.cafeshops.com/brainfartdesign
Panth's Brag Site - pics, writing and such -
http://www.fandomnet.com/panthology/fic/

Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us