Fletcher Capstan Tables

Sun, 10 Dec 2006 09:54:57 +1030

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
http://www.dbfletcher.com/capstan/

It is a circular table which, when rotated at its outer perimeter,
doubles its seating capacity, yet astonishingly remains truly circular.

The expansion leaves are stored within the table and, in just four
seconds, smoothly and quickly emerge upon rotation, rising and radially
expanding outwards as the entire top is turned through 30˚. Existing
tables can seat six persons when small, and twelve or more when
expanded, but there are other design possibilities.

Share and enjoy,
                *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email


Sun, 10 Dec 2006 10:24:25 -0800

"Linda Page" <lindapage [at] earthlink.net>

Linda Page
One of the coolest things about this is that you don't have to worry where
to store the extensions.  When I was a kid my Mom's table had 3 and they
were always disappearing when we needed them.
        :o)
        Linda P

When you hurt another person the one who is hurt the most is yourself.   -
Wayne Dyer

-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Pam <mailto:xanni@glasswings.com.au>
Sent: Saturday, December 09, 2006 3:25 PM
To: Glass Wings list
Subject: Fletcher Capstan Tables

http://www.dbfletcher.com/capstan/

It is a circular table which, when rotated at its outer perimeter,
doubles its seating capacity, yet astonishingly remains truly circular.

The expansion leaves are stored within the table and, in just four
seconds, smoothly and quickly emerge upon rotation, rising and radially
expanding outwards as the entire top is turned through 30˚. Existing
tables can seat six persons when small, and twelve or more when
expanded, but there are other design possibilities.

Share and enjoy,
                *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:21:43 +1030

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
On Sun, 2006-12-10 at 10:24 -0800, Linda Page wrote:
One of the coolest things about this is that you don't have to worry where
to store the extensions.  When I was a kid my Mom's table had 3 and they
were always disappearing when we needed them.

We have a large square table I inherited from my grandmother that has
storage space underneath for two leaves that make it into a rectangular
table either 50% or 100% longer.  I always liked the design.

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Sun, 7 Jan 2007 20:25:28 -0800

"Linda Page" <lightlady27 [at] sbcglobal.net>

Linda Page
I've seen tables that had the leaves folded under the edges, in various
different ways, piano hinge type stuff, and regular folding ones, but that
sounds interesting.  I've seen one that had a sort of pedestal and the
leaves folded down, there were extensions inside the pedestal part, but that
capstan table is gorgeous, such a conversation piece.
        It's fun to examine furniture designs and see how they did things.
        :o)
        Linda P

When you hurt another person the one who is hurt the most is yourself.
-Wayne Dyer

-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Pam <mailto:xanni@glasswings.com.au>
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2007 5:52 PM
To: gwlist@glasswings.com.au
Subject: RE: Fletcher Capstan Tables

On Sun, 2006-12-10 at 10:24 -0800, Linda Page wrote:
One of the coolest things about this is that you don't have to worry where
to store the extensions.  When I was a kid my Mom's table had 3 and they
were always disappearing when we needed them.

We have a large square table I inherited from my grandmother that has
storage space underneath for two leaves that make it into a rectangular
table either 50% or 100% longer.  I always liked the design.

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 16:53:53 +1030

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
On Sun, 2007-01-07 at 20:25 -0800, Linda Page wrote:
I've seen tables that had the leaves folded under the edges, in various
different ways, piano hinge type stuff, and regular folding ones, but that
sounds interesting.

Ours doesn't fold at all - it has wooden rails, and the tabletop splits
in the middle with each half sliding outward on the rails to make room
for the extra leaf or leaves in the centre.  Rather ingenious.

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                         Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                       Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/                   Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                      Manager, Serious Cybernetics
Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us