Robot ethics

Thu, 08 Mar 2007 12:11:05 +1030

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
An ethical code to prevent humans abusing robots, and vice versa, is
being drawn up by South Korea.

The Robot Ethics Charter will cover standards for users and
manufacturers and will be released later in 2007.

It is being put together by a five member team of experts that includes
futurists and a science fiction writer.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6425927.stm

Share and enjoy,
                *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                   Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email


Sat, 10 Mar 2007 09:28:52 +1030

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
Hey!

On Thursday 08 March 2007 12:11, Andrew Pam wrote:
An ethical code to prevent humans abusing robots, and vice versa, is
being drawn up by South Korea...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6425927.stm

Robotics and artificial intelligence are two different things, though they can
be united. We are much more likely to see artificial intelligence popping up
on our PCs first, particularly for searching information on the Net.

Mind you the predictions that we would be getting this sort of intelligence in
the near future have been ongoing. It's right up there with "Where's my
hover-car?"

I am glad they are thinking through the ethics of these things. What's
frustrating is this:

A draft of the proposals said: "In the 21st Century humanity will coexist
with the first alien intelligence we have ever come into contact with -
robots. It will be an event rich in ethical, social and economic problems."

We are discovering that many of the animals we have been living with for
millenia are much smarter than we have realised or given them credit for. We
simply have not understood them. We have a UN charter for the rights of the
child. However, many animals have an intelligence equal to and surpassing
children of certain ages. Shouldn't they then be covered by the same rights?
My sense is that as soon as an animal is capable of self-reflective thinking,
it must be treated as an individual with certain inalienable rights. This
would be the same point at which you would also need to start considering
conferring rights to artificial intelligences.

Cheers,

Katherine
a muse


--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Comment via email

Sat, 10 Mar 2007 13:54:08 +1100

The Colective <colective [at] glasswings.com.au>

The Colective
mz kitty sed:

Robotics and artificial intelligence are two different things, though
they can be united. We are much more likely to see artificial
intelligence popping up on our PCs first, particularly for searching
information on the Net.

so long as my computer answers "yes, how may this most humble servamnt
assist you" in a submisive feminine voice i'll be happy ;) none of this
starship bob or marvin crap :P

Mind you the predictions that we would be getting this sort of
intelligence in the near future have been ongoing. It's right up
there with "Where's my hover-car?"

oh i dunno ... i think all you need to do is look at most goverments of
the world to find artificial intelligence ;)

<snippage of bleeding heart pinko greeny rhetoric>..... <hides under
sofa from katherine's wrath> <gigglefluff>

This  would be the same point at which you would also need to start
considering conferring rights to artificial intelligences.

i guess that also comes under the umbrella of prosthetics ... where do you draw
the line ala ghost in the shell or bubblegum crisis... is the digitized copy of
a once biological form artificial? and how would that then transfer across to
an individual who's wetware has crashed and requires hardware to continue to
funtion?

/\__/\
 (^^)
 )""(
(w__w)

Sat, 10 Mar 2007 15:47:05 +1030

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
Hey Fluff Ball!

On Saturday 10 March 2007 13:24, The Colective wrote:
so long as my computer answers "yes, how may this most humble servamnt
assist you" in a submisive feminine voice i'll be happy ;) none of this
starship bob or marvin crap :P

What? You don't find Marvin sexy? I thought he'd be right up your alley rather
than your nose.

This  would be the same point at which you would also need to start
considering conferring rights to artificial intelligences.

i guess that also comes under the umbrella of prosthetics ... where do
you draw the line ala ghost in the shell or bubblegum crisis... is the
digitized copy of a once biological form artificial? and how would that
then transfer across to an individual who's wetware has crashed and
requires hardware to continue to funtion?

Andrew and I used to discuss this in relationship to Max Headroom.

If you could upload all of your memories, all of your thoughts, and all of
your emotions into something like a computer, I do not believe the result
would be a continuation of you. First, you would need hardware and software
that would make it possible to continue to combine and recombine this
information self-reflectively while interacting with the environment. Even
so, you would no longer be experiencing the world in the same way, since you
would be using different equipment to do so. In fact even the differences in
the manner of processing this information by the constructed "you" would
begin to create subtle or perhaps not so subtle differences in understanding
and reactions. The results of all this being that you might have created
something like you, but it would not be you--no more than your child is you.

I sometimes laugh at extropian ideas that uploading ourselves onto computers
is going to create human immortality: only if you aren't using something like
Microsoft Ghost in the Box version 2.1 that has a tendency to crash and
corrupt your memory files.

Anyway, I believe that even though this construct isn't "you", if it is
self-aware, if it is capable of imagining its own ending and is concerned
about maintaining its existence, if it is capable of making independent
decisions, whether we gave birth to it in a factory or through a womb it has
a right to its existence and to have its decisions respected within the
confines of doing no harm. This issue came up with the Tachikoma in Ghost in
the Shell Stand Alone Complex.

Cheers,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Sat, 10 Mar 2007 18:48:04 +1100

"The Colective" <colective [at] viper.net.au>

The Colective
musely remarked:

What? You don't find Marvin sexy? I thought he'd be right up your
alley rather than your nose.

up my ally? erm, sorry muse.... i dont swing that way :P


Andrew and I used to discuss this in relationship to Max Headroom.

If you could upload all of your memories, all of your thoughts, and
all of your emotions into something like a computer, I do not
believe the result would be a continuation of you. First, you would
need hardware and software that would make it possible to continue
to combine and recombine this information self-reflectively while
interacting with the environment.

and what then is the human brain if not a computer running the software we
call life?

Even so, you would no longer be experiencing the world in the same way,
since you would be using different equipment to do so.

so in effect you are saying that if you were once sighted and loose your
eyesight or could hear and then loose your hearing, you are no longer "you"
any more because you are no longer experiencing the world in the same way?

In fact even the differences in the  manner of processing this information by
the constructed "you" would  begin to create subtle or perhaps not so subtle
differences in  understanding and reactions. The results of all this being
that you might have created something like you, but it would not be you--no
more than your child is you.

again... what is our wetware but a construct simply made from differnt
materials... it all comes down to a matter of time... unless you have a time
machine what proof do you have that our understanding of biology and our
technological ability wont some day meet?

and people call me a pesemist! ok... granted .. given the human
predisposition for self distruction chances are you guys will have whiped
yourselves out b4 that happens....

bunnies rule, humans drool!

/\__/\
 (^^)
 )""(
(w__w)

Sun, 11 Mar 2007 09:34:19 +1030

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
Hey!

On Saturday 10 March 2007 18:18, The Colective wrote:
If you could upload all of your memories, all of your thoughts, and
all of your emotions into something like a computer, I do not
believe the result would be a continuation of you. First, you would
need hardware and software that would make it possible to continue
to combine and recombine this information self-reflectively while
interacting with the environment.

and what then is the human brain if not a computer running the software we
call life?

That's something of an over-simplification. This assumption is what has given
AI researchers such a difficult time in the past.

Even so, you would no longer be experiencing the world in the same way,
since you would be using different equipment to do so.

so in effect you are saying that if you were once sighted and loose your
eyesight or could hear and then loose your hearing, you are no longer "you"
any more because you are no longer experiencing the world in the same way?

That's an interesting philosophical question. How much of you do you have to
lose or change before you are a different person? But of course I'm not
talking about simply a quantitative difference when we are speaking of the
brain, but an entire world-view qualitative difference.

If your thoughts are no longer formed in the same way, would you continue to
have the same sorts of thoughts? If you no longer have the same sorts of
thoughts, are you really still the same person?

A simple chemical change can cause people to think and behave in very
different ways such that others comment that they aren't themselves, for
instance when someone is under the influence of alcohol.

In fact even the differences in the  manner of processing this information
by the constructed "you" would  begin to create subtle or perhaps not so
subtle differences in  understanding and reactions. The results of all
this being that you might have created something like you, but it would
not be you--no more than your child is you.

again... what is our wetware but a construct simply made from differnt
materials... it all comes down to a matter of time... unless you have a
time machine what proof do you have that our understanding of biology and
our technological ability wont some day meet?

Okay, if we were to attempt moving human consciousness from a brain into a
computer made of metal wires and silicon, your first problem is simply how do
you access both memories AND thought processes in order to make the transfer?
How do you ensure that the ways in which certain thoughts have been
connecting, continue to connect in similar manners? Brains function at both a
biological and quantum level to form thoughts according to current research.
Simply having memories and an ability to use those memories may not be enough
to maintain a person's individuality, even if you overcome a whole slough of
technological difficulties. This doesn't mean it can't happen, but it's not
going to happen overnight.

If it's cognitive immortality you are after, a much more likely solution would
be to use stem cells to grow another brain that has used all the same
genetics, has all the same chemical and bio-electrical properties that you
do, then find someway to transfer memories and linking pathways of thought.

and people call me a pesemist! ok... granted .. given the human
predisposition for self distruction chances are you guys will have whiped
yourselves out b4 that happens....

I didn't think I was being pessimistic, just aware of the problems that people
are overlooking.

Cheers,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------
Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us