New and improved Australian citizenship test

Wed, 29 Aug 2007 23:41:44 +0930

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
"It's time for a real test that requires real Australian qualities.
Here's my citizenship test and if you don't like it you can rack off and
go back to your own country."

http://www.theage.com.au/news/opinion/we-dont-want-your-rich-migrant-culture/2007/08/28/1188067108372.html?page=fullpage

Share and enjoy,
                *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                   Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email


Wed, 29 Aug 2007 10:56:35 -0500

"David Duke" <theduke1 [at] mindspring.com>

David Duke
Dear Pam~my,

  I couldn't understand a single word of that!  Will Kat translate?

  Cheers,

  Tex


----- Original Message -----
From: "Andrew Pam" <xanni@glasswings.com.au>
To: <gwlist@glasswings.com.au>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2007 9:11 AM
Subject: New and improved Australian citizenship test


"It's time for a real test that requires real Australian qualities.
Here's my citizenship test and if you don't like it you can rack off and
go back to your own country."

http://www.theage.com.au/news/opinion/we-dont-want-your-rich-migrant-culture/2007/08/28/1188067108372.html?page=fullpage

Share and enjoy,
*** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net                   Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/                Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email

Thu, 30 Aug 2007 08:46:10 +0930

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
Hi!

On Thursday 30 August 2007 01:26, David Duke wrote:
  I couldn't understand a single word of that!  Will Kat translate?

Oh dear. Well, the language here is colorful in all senses. Australians
certainly let it all hang out (to use an American turn of phrase).

Poxy: Covered in pox, as in chicken, small, or other diseases that cause you
to do giraffe impressions.

Date: Ahem, well, it certainly has nothing to do with middle eastern fruit.
Posterior indentation.

Wankers: Double ahem. Men who know how to enjoy themselves.

Bludgers: Someone living the good life at the tax-payers expense, hence
someone you would like to bludgeon.

Rack-off: Really this should be "rack-on" as in "Put the rack on your car,
toss all your stuff on it, and vamoose."

Died in the arse: Only obliquely to do with posterior indentation. It didn't
work out in the end.

Mole: Moll, a very friendly woman.

Chuck a sickie: Taking a day off under pretense of mortal illness.

Chuck a spaz: Do your nut.

Chuck a U-ey: Make a u-turn.

Pav: Pavlova, a lovely dessert of meringue topped with fruit. Named in honour
of a ballet dancer.

Esky: Freezer box.

A crock: This is not just any crocodile, but one filled with garden
fertiliser.

"In the arvo last Chrissy the relos rocked up for a barbie, some bevvies and a
few snags. After a bit of a Bex and a lie down we opened the pressies,
scoffed all the chockies, bickies and lollies. Then we drained a few tinnies
and Mum did her block after Dad and Steve had a barney and a bit of biffo."

Translation: Last midwinter festivities the relatives indulged in decadent
behaviour resulting in familial fisticuffs.

"Macca, Chooka and Wanger are driving to Surfers in their Torana. If they are
travelling at 100 km/h while listening to Barnsey, Farnsey and Acca Dacca,
how many slabs will each person on average consume between flashing a brown
eye and having a slash?"

Translation: A trio of uneducated young gentleman are driving to the beach in
a car favoured by their class. If they are travelling at high velocity while
listening to the musical equivalent of hog callers, how much will they need
to imbibe before exposing their posterior indentations and releasing tired
blood?

"Have you ever been on the giving or receiving end of a wedgie?"

Has anyone tried to check the tag on your underwear?

"Is it possible to "prang a car" while doing "circle work"?"

Is it possible to cause damage to a car while doing the smallest possible
circuit in dusty terrain?

"Who would you like to crack on to?"

Is there be someone with whom you would consider conjugal relations?

I hope this was of some assistance.

Regards,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter and imagination
----------------------------------

Thu, 30 Aug 2007 04:04:11 +0000

campbell_hewston [at] ekit.com

griffin.png
In our defense we normally don't use all these terms at once.

Some were brought to the country by immigrants and can be traced
back to there source others we locally produced.  Some are only in
certain places

I have some favourites.

Rozza, a Policeman or COP this is Scottish and only used in the
Western part of Australia.

Slab, case of beer 5% alcahol, also a unit of measure eg Q "how big
is it" A "About a slab" also as currancy "it will cost you a slab".
Less than 5% alchol is refered to as "light" beer.

Certain rules pertain to the language down here.

Such as any long word or name is to be shortened, any thing short is
lengthened.

Cockney (as in England) has a type of ryming slang that is enjoyed
here as well eg "You and me" meaning key

This happens with physical actions as well.
From the part of the country I am from if you are driving down a
deserted country road and see one of your neighbours driving a
tractor or something you wave by raising one of 2 fingers from the
steering wheel as you pass, the opposite way to the insult.
This I found out comes from Cornwall (again in England)there were
Cornish immigrants for the original gold rush in Australia.

The article mentioned New Zealand or NZ to us if you want to fit in
over there end your sentances with "ay"


Campbell Hewston or cam










Quoting Katherine Phelps <muse@glasswings.com.au> on Thu, 30 Aug
2007 08:46:10 +0930:

Hi!

On Thursday 30 August 2007 01:26, David Duke
wrote:
  I couldn't understand a single word of that!
Will Kat translate?

Oh dear. Well, the language here is colorful in
all senses. Australians
certainly let it all hang out (to use an American
turn of phrase).

Poxy: Covered in pox, as in chicken, small, or
other diseases that cause you
to do giraffe impressions.

Date: Ahem, well, it certainly has nothing to do
with middle eastern fruit.
Posterior indentation.

Wankers: Double ahem. Men who know how to enjoy
themselves.

Bludgers: Someone living the good life at the
tax-payers expense, hence
someone you would like to bludgeon.

Rack-off: Really this should be "rack-on" as in
"Put the rack on your car,
toss all your stuff on it, and vamoose."

Died in the arse: Only obliquely to do with
posterior indentation. It didn't
work out in the end.

Mole: Moll, a very friendly woman.

Chuck a sickie: Taking a day off under pretense of
mortal illness.

Chuck a spaz: Do your nut.

Chuck a U-ey: Make a u-turn.

Pav: Pavlova, a lovely dessert of meringue topped
with fruit. Named in honour
of a ballet dancer.

Esky: Freezer box.

A crock: This is not just any crocodile, but one
filled with garden
fertiliser.

"In the arvo last Chrissy the relos rocked up for
a barbie, some bevvies and a
few snags. After a bit of a Bex and a lie down we
opened the pressies,
scoffed all the chockies, bickies and lollies.
Then we drained a few tinnies
and Mum did her block after Dad and Steve had a
barney and a bit of biffo."

Translation: Last midwinter festivities the
relatives indulged in decadent
behaviour resulting in familial fisticuffs.

"Macca, Chooka and Wanger are driving to Surfers
in their Torana. If they are
travelling at 100 km/h while listening to Barnsey,
Farnsey and Acca Dacca,
how many slabs will each person on average consume
between flashing a brown
eye and having a slash?"

Translation: A trio of uneducated young gentleman
are driving to the beach in
a car favoured by their class. If they are
travelling at high velocity while
listening to the musical equivalent of hog
callers, how much will they need
to imbibe before exposing their posterior
indentations and releasing tired
blood?

"Have you ever been on the giving or receiving end
of a wedgie?"

Has anyone tried to check the tag on your
underwear?

"Is it possible to "prang a car" while doing
"circle work"?"

Is it possible to cause damage to a car while
doing the smallest possible
circuit in dusty terrain?

"Who would you like to crack on to?"

Is there be someone with whom you would consider
conjugal relations?

I hope this was of some assistance.

Regards,

Katherine

--
----------------------------------
E-Mail: muse@glasswings.com.au
BA (Hons), MFA, PhD
http://www.glasswings.com.au/
Nothing can withstand the powers of love, laughter
and imagination
----------------------------------





____________________________________________________________________
eKit - the global phonecard with more!

Spend less on overseas calls, receive messages worldwide.
Visit http://www.ekit.com/ for details.
Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us